HMHS 172 - Use The Volume Knob (09/04/2009

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tonyoci
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Re: HMHS 172 - Use The Volume Knob (09/04/2009

Post by tonyoci » Wed Sep 09, 2009 11:40 pm

Thankis for all the comments, great to read people popping in to say hello.

Chick,, I definitely meant "Does room treatment matter? " I'm not sure many "professionals" are recording in a spare bedroom though :)
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Re: HMHS 172 - Use The Volume Knob (09/04/2009

Post by lucas » Thu Sep 10, 2009 3:15 pm

Tone knob
I find it very useful to tweak the tone knob on strats.
I have a 'Fat Strat' which has humbucker in the bridge position.
I like the sound I get with the switch in position 2 (Bridge & middle pickups) and the tone knob at a about 3 or 4.
I usually keep the volume knob around 8 or 9.

recording dry & distorted guitars
there was a Reaper tutorial that talked about recording a clean, dry signal along with the wet, distorted signal from the guitar.
this was purely for editing purpose later and is useful because the recorded waveform for the distorted signal lacks the clear definition the dry signal has.
this makes it easier to see where notes begin and end.
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Re: HMHS 172 - Use The Volume Knob (09/04/2009

Post by chckn8r » Thu Sep 10, 2009 4:07 pm

tonyoci wrote:I'm not sure many "professionals" are recording in a spare bedroom though :)
I didn't say that did I? Nah.... :P

I think heading towards "professionalism" and getting that sound under control includes moving out of the bedroom and either remodeling a basement or building a "shed" in the backyard...
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Re: HMHS 172 - Use The Volume Knob (09/04/2009

Post by Zoetrope » Fri Sep 11, 2009 11:08 am

criddlerus wrote:I have recorded plenty of drums. I find the most important thing is actually the drummer. A really good drummer will sound fantastic if he is playing in an elevator shaft or a room full of pillows.
You've reminded me of the time (many moons ago) my band rehearsed with a different drummer. Our usual guy was ok. He kept a beat, tossed in a few fills. The sub for this one practice was from the Chicago punk band Friends of Betty (and later Red Red Meat and Urge Overkill, I think). He was amazing. It wasn't just that the drums sounded better. The whole band sounded better. Every song suddenly had an energy it had never had before. (We begged him to join the band, but he was already in a few at the same time.)

So yeah, a good drummer makes a big difference, whether it's recording or playing live.

As for room treatment, I think there's a big leap from the standard home recordist to someone that even knows what a standing wave is let alone what to do about it. Does it make a difference? Yes, but probably not as much as just upgrading a few weak links in your signal chain would.
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Re: HMHS 172 - Use The Volume Knob (09/04/2009

Post by chckn8r » Fri Sep 11, 2009 12:01 pm

Whole heartedly agree on the drummer being crucial to the feel of the band.
Zoetrope wrote:As for room treatment, I think there's a big leap from the standard home recordist to someone that even knows what a standing wave is let alone what to do about it. Does it make a difference? Yes, but probably not as much as just upgrading a few weak links in your signal chain would.
Yeah - totally agree - big leap, but there are degrees of attention to every aspect of a person's recording "rig". We all started off somewhere small and have eventually acquired things, tweaked things, added, subtracted ... whatnot. It's really a whole system kind of thing as you start honing in on that "perfect" sound as you keep on evolving your craft and develop more discerning listening skills.

I'm not one to say I'm even coming close to being "there" yet, but I definitely can look back and see how far I've come from that one Korg Workstation with a multi-track sequencer built in it to now... it's taken a long time building up my gear inventory as well as paying attention to the environment in which I make music.
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