I need questions - Larry Crane agrees to an interview

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I need questions - Larry Crane agrees to an interview

Post by tonyoci » Wed Dec 14, 2005 6:18 pm

Larry Crane from Tape Op magazine has agreed to an interview on the Home Made Hit Show. It should only last about 5-10 minutes but no I desperately need questions.

Suggestions please.

Tony
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Post by Rick Jones » Wed Dec 14, 2005 6:39 pm

I couldn't find the link to this new song. Oops wrong forum. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Is this the Larry Crane of Storyville and John Mellenhead fame? My brother interviewed him at WORX years ago and said he's a short , but amiable fellow. Maybe you could ask him who he'd love to work with? I know....boring......butt kissing.....wake me when it's over.....kind of question, but what can you do? Why don't you let him interview you? That way, he gets to talk about what he wants and the pressure's off yourself. Unless he digs into your sordid past. Then we're all ears. :o
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Post by chf » Wed Dec 14, 2005 7:09 pm

Well I'm afraid my question would be along the lines of "who are you?" followed by "are you going away for Xmas?"

Chf

ps I tried "abstract" on Babelfish and I came out sounding like Arnie so I'm afraid you're stuck with it, Tony.

pps tell us who he is and we'll think of some questions.
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Post by tonyoci » Wed Dec 14, 2005 7:51 pm

I think if you don't know who he is then Zoetrope may throw you off the forum :D

Larry Crane is the editor of Tape Op magazine which is a long running mag all about recording (www.tapeop.com). He also runs a studio and wrote a book on recording in the home and small studios.

I am not really up on the biz but I've heard of him :D
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Post by Omegaman » Wed Dec 14, 2005 8:20 pm

question one: he has been doing this a long time, does he ever get bored?

question 2: if he were just starting out today, what would be his first m ove? what gear would he look to get, what would he read etc?

question 3: For the budget conscious, just getting started, what is the best bang for the buck , mic, pre amp, recorder, software etc

Question 4: Does he remember the first time he had an epiphany about recording and what was it/ in other words, when did the first light bulb go off and he realize he had learned something.

Question 5: why doesn't his mag talk more about recording horns? I have heard so much garbage for "studios" when horns are involved with a band. Unless the owner is a horn player they just don't seem to understand how to make horns sound good.

My invoice is in the mail. ;-)
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Post by Lee » Wed Dec 14, 2005 11:32 pm

Tony,

It sounds like a long boring interview to me. :) I wish I were kidding.

See if you can't encapsulate his answers to be featured as tidbits and advice on each program and milk this thing for all it's worth! Then it will only be a minute or two of boring talk on the show from time to time and you won't loose any non-recording listeners.

Just trying to help man. (I know.. I know... I owe you a jingle)
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Post by tonyoci » Thu Dec 15, 2005 1:58 am

Maybe I'll talk him into the Larry Crane tip of the week.

Tony
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Post by storpotaten » Thu Dec 15, 2005 2:30 pm

Question for LC: What will be the major changes in home recording technology over the next 5 to 10 years? E.g. the past ten or so years everyone has thrown away their cassette recorders and bought digital recording equipment - what is the next step?
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Post by chf » Thu Dec 15, 2005 8:14 pm

Qs for LC: hasn't the professional quality available to the home recorder opened our eyes to the emperor's new clothes aspect of the music industry...and does he believe that the industry should be worried that we will turn away from mainstream music to such an extent that the industry will cease to exist as a unified provider of music?

How does he feel that the industry is being overtaken by the thousands of splinter cells being lived around the world?

Chf
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tapeop?!

Post by radiofreesrini » Fri Dec 16, 2005 4:30 am

cool! i read an interview with him many years ago in "Cassette Mythos" - must have been back in the 80's... katrina walloped new orleans where they've been having their convention, i wonder where to next?

also i'm curious if he's got a take on how the home recording phenomenon has altered the music industry as a whole and if he sees the revolution coming anytime soon and what we zoomers can do about it :) [i guess that's just restating chf's question above]

and then there's the international aspect - from how far afield has he received recordings? it'd be interesting if he were getting, like, islamic speedmetal in the mail

-s
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Post by Zoetrope » Sun Dec 18, 2005 12:44 pm

I would get him to talk about his feelings having to move TapeOpCon from New Orleans for 2006, I know that was difficult for him. Then get into the good stuff, where is home recording headed, where is the small studio headed (he runs one so he'll have some thoughts), and where is TapeOp headed. What's coming in 2006 and what's coming in the next 5 years.

He seems (from the mag) like a really nice guy, have fun with the interview, and tell him thanks from me and all the other home recordists out here for an amazing magazine.
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Post by Lee » Mon Dec 19, 2005 12:39 am

Okay... okay... I have a question for this Crane character.
:arrow: “Will we see the day when home recording truly equals or at least rivals professional recording? If yes, then how and when? If not, then why?”
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Post by Omegaman » Mon Dec 19, 2005 10:26 am

Lee,

I will predict his answer. The technology is there now, its the execution that is not in some places.

A lot would also depend upon how one defines home recording. For example: my brother in law has a 48 track studio in the basement of his condo and has produced some very good recordings from there. He was ADAT a while back when I recorded part of a soundtrack with him, but now he is MOTU. So does that qualify as home recording ? (he also built an iso vocal booth and a room from drums, non parallel walls, limited connection to the supporting structure, double doors, yadda yadda yadda.

I would suggest that with a decent recorder (from zoom up to PC/MAC based) and the right person at the controls, it can be done now there.

It's much like the desktop publishing (or video camcorder)craze, the technology is readily available, but just because you have the physical tools doesn't mean you have the ability to use them to anythign near their potential and turn out Professional results.

(sorry for the kinda OT response, just my guess on what LC would answer)

;-)
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Post by Rick Jones » Mon Dec 19, 2005 11:04 am

True, we all have guitars, but are we all Brian Setzer or Liona Boyd? If I knew how to use 50% of what I do have, it'd be nice. I blame the O-man for getting me off topic. :wink:
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Post by Lee » Mon Dec 19, 2005 11:41 am

It's time to wake up from your slumber pillow boys. :lol:

If he responded with an answer like Rick’s then I would think that Tony has every right to drop kick him out the third floor window (virtually, of course). Because that would undermine the unspoken creed of home recorders… it’s practically blasphemy to even suggest such a thing! (Okay, I’m overdoing it… but do you know what I mean?)

That very well may be his response, but it’s not unlike any other technology. In the eighties CD burners were six figures in price and early on had a high failure rate. Nowadays, any Joe PC owner can get one for free (after the mail in rebates) and pretty much be guaranteed a greater than 95% success rate. Technology constantly tries to bridge the gap between the full time professional and the novice who doesn’t have the time or desire to become an expert.

I suppose the question is hard to really quantify because there’s different levels of cost involved and whatnot. I guess the question should be, “when can Joe Musician expect to be able to make home recordings that rival the pros without having to become a pro?” In a way it’s a fundamental question that a person at the forefront of a technology should be able to give a relatively hard/solid answer for.

I’ve heard some great home recordings, but it seems like the post recording work/production stuff makes it that way. When can a lot of that work be replaced with a big fat red easy button?

Heck, I'm just thinking of what I had to go through fifteen years ago to record at home and what I go through now is but a fraction of the effort and with much greater results. Technology has made the difference there... not my skill.
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Post by MatBio » Mon Dec 19, 2005 12:01 pm

I think Omega and Lee are both right. Music is in the ear not the gear. I think a good musician with a good producer can record using whatever is at hand, for example "Black Keys", a band that I like a lot, recorded their first album with a cheapo tascam 24 track, a cheap guitar and amp and drums. it more about how to get a sound with the gear you have.

For example, I'm satisfied with my guitar sound, but it is in no way because of the gear I use, it has something to do with it, but it is more about musical maturity. A friend of mine, that has a great guitar amp and effects, gets the nastiest sound I have ever heard, and no matter what i tell him, he can't get a decent sound out of it.

On the other hand, the technology allows us to emulate great recording sounds, without having to spend too much money. Amp modeling, and accessible digital track recorder, are a good combination to put ideas together. and as Lee say, now you can get CD quality recordings without having to spend too much money. hell, even mastering, can be done with cheap mastering tools, that will give you an almost professional sound (La Grange is a good example).

Anyway, it should be Larry Crane who gives the answer and I think it is a good question. Some questions:

1. Should we worry about mastering? about the quality of our recording?
2. What to do if we want to get professional review of our home recordings?
3. Should there be any concern about copyrights when we post our music?
4. If we want to improve our recordings, where do we start?
5. Why is the subscription to TapeOP magazine so expensive?
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Post by tonyoci » Mon Dec 19, 2005 12:17 pm

MatBio wrote: 5. Why is the subscription to TapeOP magazine so expensive?
Was that a joke - tape op is free ????

I'm really unsure where I fall on the technology issue. I am a remarkably limited player. I actually only know around 15 chords on piano and guitar + my one finger bass playing yet I can get a remarkably full sounding song out very quickly. Is that the technology ? I don't know but I certainly couldn't do it before the technology. It was in fact the technology that inspired me to learn those 15 chords. I decided to learn guitar about 3 years ago and basically learned nothing until I got the PS04 in January 2005, now I was willing to take a few lessons and practice a little cause it gave me a hope of getting a good sound.

The technology allows me to cut and paste around my limitations and errors, that's one major advantage.

While no "real" guitar player would be fooled I think you could play my songs to the general public and not one would know I had less than one years playing experience.

This has expanded to the point where I might soon actually be playing live in a friends small restaurant. :shock:
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